Robin Madel

Robin Madel works on water and waste issues and the food-water-energy nexus. Robin produces reports and multimedia content and is a regular contributor to GRACE's Ecocentric blog. She has been published in Huffington Post, AlterNet and Grist. Prior to GRACE, Robin worked as a Recording Secretary and Research Assistant for the city of Boulder Public Works Water and Transportation Departments and as a Project Manager at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, managing treatability studies and site cleanup projects. Robin received an MS in Environmental Science and Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines, a BS in Civil Engineering and a BA in Geological Sciences - both from the University of Colorado at Boulder and she recently completed a Certificate in Journalism from New York University. She is an avid photographer who increasingly shoots food, water and energy sustainability topics and she's also an actor, so she's usually not too far away from a camera of some sort.

Fighting Food Waste with Lunch for 5000

Whoever said there's no free lunch? On Tuesday, over 5,000 people gathered in Union Square to get a free bowl of ratatouille and a piece of torte, all made from food that would've otherwise been wasted. Check out our pictures from the event!

Why Don't All Farms Use Drip Irrigation?

Many Californians are looking at their brown lawns and wondering why all farmers don't make the switch to drip irrigation. That would free up more water for cities, right? Read on for the answers - plus everything you ever wanted to know about farm irrigation, and what it all means for water conservation.

Why We Need a Spanish Water Footprint Calculator

Last month, GRACE released a Spanish version of our Water Footprint Calculator and water saving tips. This is a tremendous opportunity to spread the message about water conservation and efficiency to an audience that often gets ignored in eco-minded efforts.

Get to Work! Jobs in Water Protection

Love water? Hunting for a new job? You might be able to make a splash with a career in water protection. Our need for water and wastewater management is only going to grow. Whether you're a scientist, an advocate, a writer or an accountant, you'll be needed!

Resilience in Our Food System? It Might be Closer Than You Think

Big Ag's answer to climate change is GMOs, more centralized systems - and irrigation, irrigation, irrigation. We think the answer to building resilience in our food system might be a little closer to home, with innovative agricultural systems like rooftop farming and aquaponics.

Presidents Gone Green

America's 44 presidents have dealt with environmental and climate issues since our nation's beginning. From Thomas Jefferson to Barack Obama, here's how they've managed and grown our food, water and energy systems!

Cranberries: Bogged Down in Water and Pollution

When you think about Thanksgiving turkey, what else comes to mind? No, not mashed potatoes and gravy: we're talking about cranberries. Most people either love or hate their sweet-tart flavor. We happen to love cranberries, but once we started looking into the impacts that conventional farming methods have on the environment, our relationship turned a little sour.

It's Not Easy Being a Little Fish

If we are what we eat, are we also what we eat eats? If you eat salmon, tuna, shrimp or many other types of farmed fish, then you're eating the fishmeal they eat. And it is not sustainable. Find out why in this post.

Talking Turkey About Farmed Fish With Marianne Cufone

Have you ever stared at a menu in a seafood restaurant wondering which fish is okay to order? We have too, so we got some guidance from Marianne Cufone, executive director of the Recirculating Farms Coalition. Marianne also told us what makes the rapidly expanding practice of aquaculture sustainable (or not).

2015 River Network River Heroes: B.J. Cummings

In this week's installment of Our Heroes, we talk with B.J. Cummings, founder of the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition's Technical Advisory Group. Cummings led a public campaign called "River For All" which generated thousands of formal comments on EPA's cleanup plan for the Lower Duwamish River and also garnered more than 43,000 letters written to the City of Seattle.

Through Art, The Value of Food Expressed

What does "food" mean to you? A new show about the expansive topic at the Cathedral of St. Join the Divine tackles the diversity of it and delivers it well done. The show, called The Value of Food, runs through April 3, 2016. Read on to learn more about the show.

2015 River Network River Heroes: Laura Rose Day

In this week's installment of Our Heroes, we talk with Laura Rose Day, Executive Director of the Penobscot River Restoration Trust, one of River Network's 2015 River Heroes. Day works to create sustainable sea-run fisheries on the river and oversaw removal of two dams, helping restore the lower Penobscot River to a free running waterway for the first time in nearly 200 years, and affecting nearly 1,000 miles of river.

2015 River Network River Heroes: Jennifer Pitt

In this week's installment of Our Heroes, we talk with Jennifer Pitt of the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), one of River Network's 2015 River Heroes. Pitt manages EDF's efforts on the Colorado River to protect and restore the river's delta. In 2014, she helped bring water to the Delta for the first time in five decades.

Blue Fish, Green Fish

When the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program rates a fish as green it's a good thing. When that fish is an invasive species it's even better. Such is the case for the Chesapeake Bay blue catfish, an invasive predator.

What Ever Happened to...Acid Rain?

During the 1980s there were two kinds of rain that were hard to miss: purple and acid. Back then, Prince ruled the radio just as acid rain dominated the headlines. But is it still a problem? Find out in this post.

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