Robin Madel

Robin Madel works on water and waste issues and the food-water-energy nexus. Robin produces reports and multimedia content and is a regular contributor to GRACE's Ecocentric blog. She has been published in Huffington Post, AlterNet and Grist. Prior to GRACE, Robin worked as a Recording Secretary and Research Assistant for the city of Boulder Public Works Water and Transportation Departments and as a Project Manager at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, managing treatability studies and site cleanup projects. Robin received an MS in Environmental Science and Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines, a BS in Civil Engineering and a BA in Geological Sciences - both from the University of Colorado at Boulder and she recently completed a Certificate in Journalism from New York University. She is an avid photographer who increasingly shoots food, water and energy sustainability topics and she's also an actor, so she's usually not too far away from a camera of some sort.

Cranberries: Bogged Down in Water and Pollution

When you think about Thanksgiving turkey, what else comes to mind? No, not mashed potatoes and gravy: we're talking about cranberries. Most people either love or hate their sweet-tart flavor. We happen to love cranberries, but once we started looking into the impacts that conventional farming methods have on the environment, our relationship turned a little sour.

It's Not Easy Being a Little Fish

If we are what we eat, are we also what we eat eats? If you eat salmon, tuna, shrimp or many other types of farmed fish, then you're eating the fishmeal they eat. And it is not sustainable. Find out why in this post.

Aquaculture Week: Talking Turkey About Farmed Fish With Marianne Cufone

Have you ever stared at a menu in a seafood restaurant wondering which fish is okay to order? We have too, so we got some guidance from Marianne Cufone, executive director of the Recirculating Farms Coalition. Marianne also told us what makes the rapidly expanding practice of aquaculture sustainable (or not).

2015 River Network River Heroes: B.J. Cummings

In this week's installment of Our Heroes, we talk with B.J. Cummings, founder of the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition's Technical Advisory Group. Cummings led a public campaign called "River For All" which generated thousands of formal comments on EPA's cleanup plan for the Lower Duwamish River and also garnered more than 43,000 letters written to the City of Seattle.

Through Art, The Value of Food Expressed

What does "food" mean to you? A new show about the expansive topic at the Cathedral of St. Join the Divine tackles the diversity of it and delivers it well done. The show, called The Value of Food, runs through April 3, 2016. Read on to learn more about the show.

2015 River Network River Heroes: Laura Rose Day

In this week's installment of Our Heroes, we talk with Laura Rose Day, Executive Director of the Penobscot River Restoration Trust, one of River Network's 2015 River Heroes. Day works to create sustainable sea-run fisheries on the river and oversaw removal of two dams, helping restore the lower Penobscot River to a free running waterway for the first time in nearly 200 years, and affecting nearly 1,000 miles of river.

2015 River Network River Heroes: Jennifer Pitt

In this week's installment of Our Heroes, we talk with Jennifer Pitt of the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), one of River Network's 2015 River Heroes. Pitt manages EDF's efforts on the Colorado River to protect and restore the river's delta. In 2014, she helped bring water to the Delta for the first time in five decades.

Blue Fish, Green Fish

When the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program rates a fish as green (its highest rating for sustainability) it's a good thing. When that fish is an invasive species it's even better. Such is the case for the Chesapeake Bay blue catfish, an invasive predator species eating its way through the rivers of the Chesapeake Bay.

What Ever Happened to...Acid Rain?

During the 1980s there were two kinds of rain that were hard to miss: purple and acid. Back then, Prince ruled the radio just as acid rain dominated the headlines. But is it still a problem? Find out in this post.

Lake Mead: How Low Can You Flow?

When you find yourself in Las Vegas during the sweltering, 108-degree heat of the summer, is there a better way to beat the heat than to head to the sweltering, 125-degree heat of Hoover Dam? That's just what one of our staff members did recently. Check out her photos of the dam and of a rapidly declining Lake Mead.

How to Enjoy the Beach Without Trashing It

There's nothing better on a hot summer day than a trip to the beach. It's even good for your brain. But our love affair with that magic place where surf meets land has not always been good for the ocean itself, and most of us would do well to treat it a little more carefully. Here, step-by-step, our tips for your lightest impact trip to the beach.

Heroic Endeavors: James Whitlow Delano and @EveryDayClimateChange

Photojournalist James Whitlow Delano created @EveryDayClimateChange on Instagram, a photographic endeavor by a diverse group of photographers from five continents, to document visual evidence of climate change on people and the environment, all around the planet. We talk about his efforts in this week's Heroic Endeavor.

Water Leak? Fix It and Forget It

According to the EPA, household leaks can waste more than 1 trillion gallons of water annually nationwide, so each spring they ask everyone to take a week and hunt down the drips and streams of wasted water. Fix-a-Leak Week is March 16-22, and it's a great time to find and fix your leaks so you can save valuable water and money all year long.

Treat Yourself (Greenly)

It's cold and snowy out. You haven't seen the sun for days. "Parks and Recreation" has ended. You know what that means? It's the perfect time to "Treat Yourself"! Here are a few relaxing suggestions to help you wash those winter blues away - sustainably.

Presidents Gone Green

America's 44 presidents have dealt with environmental and climate issues since our nation's beginning. From Thomas Jefferson to Barack Obama, here's how they've managed and grown our food, water and energy systems!

Cats, Coal and Climate Change: the Real Bird Killers

An art display in Northern Manhattan is drawing attention to some of the 314 bird species threatened by climate change. A look at the causes of bird deaths illustrates that climate change (and by extension, fossil fuels) has become a major threat to birds, after cats and power lines.

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