Kai Olson-Sawyer

Kai Olson-Sawyer works on the food-water-energy nexus, water footprinting and surface and groundwater resource protection and management. Kai produces and writes reports, and creates multimedia content and is a regular contributor to GRACE's Ecocentric blog. His work has been published in Huffington Post, Civil Eats, Grist, EcoWatch and AlterNet. Prior to GRACE, Kai was a Programs Assistant and Assistant Editor at the World Forestry Center in Portland, Oregon and was a Researcher with NYC Apollo Alliance. Kai received an MA in Sociology with an environmental focus from The New School for Social Research, and a BA in English from Earlham College. He holds the Water Footprint Network's "Certificate of the Global Water Footprint Standard." His body is composed of 60 percent water.

Energy and Water Team Up at This Year's World Water Week

It's World Water Week and we're happy to report that this year's theme is "Water and Energy." Have a look at our curated list of recent posts that help to illustrate just a few examples of how water and energy are connected, and what that means for all of us.

USDA to Farmers: Plant Your Way to a Cleaner Lake Erie

The toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie that forced Toledo, Ohio authorities to cut drinking water to 400,000 people has subsided, but a major cause of pollution - agricultural runoff - has not. The USDA has taken note and is providing funding and technical support to help farmers reduce pollution.

The Complex (and Currently High) Cost of Iced Coffee

Pop quiz: Why does your iced coffee habit cost so much more this hot summer? Turns out that there's a whole lot of stuff (and effort) that goes into making that cold cup of joe. Read on for the reasons behind those jacked up prices.

In the Heat of the Summer, Sweating Outdoor Water Use

While hanging out in the yard can be carefree summer fun, saving water is serious business, especially as a devastating drought continues in the southwest US. But with these tips, conserving water doesn't have to be a drag.

In World Cup of Environmental Footprints, Tops Not Boss

The 2014 World Cup has been a great success as the finals draw near. Although knocked out earlier, the United States has few if any peers in the World Cup of large "environmental footprints." The problem is, winning that Cup is no triumph.

Energy's Big Bycatch: Power Plant Water Use Still Sucks

The 2014 River Rally in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania went swimmingly. But as one panel asked, how quickly can the United States end the process that allows hundreds of aging power plants from sucking up enormous amounts of water that kill billions of fish annually? Not as quickly as they - or the fish - would like.

Earth Day 2014: An Eco-Stravaganza of Sustainable Tips and Tricks (Part 1)

This Earth Day, the Ecocentric team is celebrating by sharing our favorite eco-friendly tips and tricks! Whether you're an old hand at ninja energy efficiency tactics or setting up your first apartment, hopefully you'll find, as we did, that there's always more to pick up by way of sustainable living.

Who's Afraid of the Clean Water Act?

The long-awaited Clean Water Act draft rules were released in a document known as the "Waters of the United States," marking one of the most substantial steps towards improved US water quality in years. One problem though: Some industries think it is governmental overreach.

West Virginia Coal Chemical Spill Causes Water Crisis

The industrial chemical spill that fouled Charleston, West Virginia's waterways is serious, and Ecocentric provides a rundown of the developing story, a collection of peoples' experiences as shared via social media and other ways to follow its aftermath.

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